December 2016  

At many California community colleges, faculty have often never seen data on their own placement policies. If asked, they wouldn't be able to tell you how many students qualify for transfer-level courses in English and math, how many have to take two or more remedial classes, and how placement rates vary across different racial/ethnic groups. This template helps to make placement practices more visible, so that colleges can understand the impact of their policies on student equity and completion. 


Share: Email Link

Areas of Impact > Placement Reform

October 2016  

Capacity Unleashed tells the stories of 13 students who participated in alternative math remediation at City College of San Francisco, Berkeley City College, College of the Canyons in Santa Clarita, and Cuyamaca College in San Diego. These colleges are among the 35 institutions in the state offering accelerated statistics pathways with the California Acceleration Project.


Share: Email Link


July 2016  

Prepared for the 2016 CAP Community of Practice, this packet includes thematic outlines from accelerated, integrated reading and writing courses taught by past participants of the program. Each outline provides the theme, primary texts, and inquiry questions for the course, along with the name and email address of the instructor who developed the course and is willing to share materials. 


Share: Email Link


June 2016  

This handout was produced for CAP faculty workshops. It outlines the major texts, tests, papers, and rubric from Katie Hern's accelerated course at Chabot College, along with the CAP instructional cycle for integrating reading and writing.


Share: Email Link


January 2016  

This article highlights research showing that students of color are placed at a structural disadvantage by traditional approaches to remediation, making them less likely to succeed in college. It features results from colleges in the California Acceleration Project that have narrowed racial achievement gaps by changing placement policies and curricula to accelerate students' progress through college-level courses.

Read more >


Share: Email Link


November 2015  

Three-quarters of California community college students are classified "unprepared" upon entry, and their long-term outcomes are bleak. This is often framed as a "college readiness" problem in the high schools, but a growing body of research suggests that incoming students are actually more ready than community colleges have recognized.

Read more >


Share: Email Link


August 2015  

This four-page brief synthesizes the national research on practices community colleges are using to substantially increase student completion of college-level courses and narrow racial achievement gaps.

Read More


Share: Email Link


December 2014  

This article for trustees presents key research into what community colleges can do to increase completion among students traditionally classified "unprepared," along with recommendations for how trustees can support these efforts. 

Read more >


Share: Email Link


November 2014  

What happened when Butte College changed its placement policy to more than double the proportion of incoming students qualifying for college English? The short answer: completion of college English increased substantially college-wide and achievement gaps narrowed, especially for Black and Hispanic students.

Read more >


Share: Email Link


October 2014  

This 2014 article from New Directions in Community Colleges discusses the factors that have helped mobilize remediation reform across California's 112 decentralized community colleges, including building a shared understanding of the problem, using data from existing accelerated models to help faculty see that students are more capable than previously believed, and collaborative faculty development efforts organized around shared principles of instructional design.


Share: Email Link


April 2014  

This quasi-experimental study found "large and robust" increases in student completion of transferable English and math courses at the first 16 colleges offering redesigned, accelerated pathways with the California Acceleration Project.


Share: Email Link


December 2013  

Addressing an important gap in the dialogue about college completion, this brief goes beyond discussions of curricular structure to focus on how faculty teach. It articulates a core set of principles and practices for teaching in accelerated models of English and math, with illustrations from community college classrooms across California.

Read more >


Share: Email Link


June 2012  

This 2012 article from the national magazine Change describes the beginnings of the California Acceleration Project, including data from early accelerated models, the design principles shared by the first CAP colleges, and some of the local adaptations colleges made as they began rethinking remediation.


Share: Email Link


December 2011  

This 2011 report presents key data from Chabot College’s long-standing model of accelerated developmental English, a four-unit integrated reading and writing course that is one-level-below College English and open to any student.


Share: Email Link


June 2011  

In this handout developed for faculty participating in the CAP Community of Practice, we define six broad strategies for addressing the affective domain, with sample practices for each.


Share: Email Link


July 2010  

In this 2010 article, Katie Hern and Myra Snell make the case that high attrition rates are structurally guaranteed in long developmental sequences and that open-access accelerated courses are a promising way to increase completion rates in college-level English and Math. Published in the RP Group's statewide publication Perspectives, the article marks the beginning of the California Acceleration Project.


Share: Email Link