October 2021  

English language learners can bring many strengths to the college composition classroom, as well as learning needs that many faculty feel ill-equipped to support. In this interactive session, experienced instructors of college composition for non-native English speakers share some of their best practices, strategies, and materials for working with this population.

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Areas of Impact > Teaching

October 2021  

This report analyzes 114 placement validation reports that CA community colleges submitted to the state Chancellor's Office to determine 1) whether colleges could identify a group of students for whom beginning in a remedial course meets the standards of AB 705, and 2) whether colleges' placement practices are having a disproportionate impact on Black and Latinx students.

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Areas of Impact > Placement Reform

September 2021  

Since the passage of AB 705, community colleges have implemented different curricular models with the goal of maximizing the rates at which English learners complete transfer-level English composition. This webinar will review these models in detail and provide a comprehensive list of the offerings in place at colleges this fall. The presenters will also share common features from course outlines and samples to help faculty at other colleges develop targeted support for ESL students enrolled in transfer-level composition.

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April 2021  

What is going on when success rates range from 20 to 100 percent across different sections of the same course? Is it AB 705? Online vs. face-to-face? Student factors like race or high school preparation? Faculty factors like part- vs. full-time status? Something else? Researchers from De Anza College present their investigation into the variability in pass rates in transfer-level math and English. Then an English faculty member from Irvine Valley College shares practical tips for addressing variability as a department.


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March 2021  

In this interactive session, Joe Feldman, career educator and author of the book Grading for Equity, and Dr. Shantha Smith provide a brief overview of the history of traditional grading and how the continued use of those practices can negatively impact teaching and learning, raise stress, and perpetuate disparities. They introduce a framework for equitable grading and provide an example, then California community college faculty share practices they have adopted based on Feldman's work, and their impact on students.


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

March 2021  

Examining the disaggregated success data for our own courses can bring up feelings of defensiveness, shame, frustration, and hopelessness. Three English faculty from Sacramento City College share how confronting and reflecting on our own data allowed us to move from these initial reactions to concrete, targeted actions that lead to more equitable outcomes, even in our current online environment. We also discuss three ways our college has supported faculty in this process.


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February 2021  

This simple, one-page resource outlines transfer-level alternatives to Intermediate Algebra for associate degree and career education students, along with B-STEM-directed students who have not passed Algebra 2. 


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February 2021  

This resource provides a one-page, simple checklist California community colleges can use to further increase student completion and equity under AB 705. 


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February 2021  

The fifth issue of the California Acceleration Project's newsletter includes:

  • Highlights from three recent research studies on AB 705
  • Grading for equity
  • Growth in SLAM and B-STEM Pathways
  • Profiles of successful corequisite students 
  • Humanizing online education
  • Supporting English language learners in online composition
  • CAP spring webinar series on addressing inequity in our classrooms

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January 2021  

Statewide research shows that English language learners who graduated from a U.S. high school are at least twice as likely to complete transfer-level English if they enroll in the course directly rather than taking a stand-alone ESL class. However, those students often benefit from support in English language conventions and cultural context. To address this, colleges across California are designating specific sections of transfer-level English for ESL students. Learn about Irvine Valley College's model and strategies to address the writing and language needs of ESL writers in transfer-level English.


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

December 2020  

Report by the California Acceleration Project and Public Advocates examines the second year of implementation of Assembly Bill 705, landmark legislation overhauling English and math remediation across California's 116 community colleges. The report highlights the huge promise of the legislation but notes that many students are left out of the reforms, especially Black and Latinx students. 


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November 2020  

ESL instructors sometimes avoid difficult topics like race, civil rights, or immigration in the beginning ESL classroom out of concern that the language of those topics might be too "advanced.” However, our students engage with such difficult topics on a daily basis, so early exposure to, and practice with, that language may benefit them. In this Nov. 6, 2020 webinar, the presenters share approaches to discussing complex social issues in beginning ESL classrooms with examples from their classrooms.


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

September 2020  

This webinar features researchers from the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) and the Multiple Measures Assessment Project (MMAP) co-presenting on the landscape of English as a Second Language (ESL) programs in the California Community College system, with a focus on the variations in ESL pathways statewide and an exploration of pathways that help maximize throughput for different ESL student groups.


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August 2020  

Though ESL and English have long been seen as two very separate disciplines, viewing the same students’ writing across multiple semesters reveals that students’ English can and does develop as they tackle the challenges of college-level coursework.  Following a close examination of selected students’ work, the presenters will share inclusive practices to support students from varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds in composition courses.

 


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

July 2020  

Fourth issue of CAP's newsletter, featuring data and stories from CA community colleges transforming placement and remediation, including highlights from the first semester of full AB 705 implementation


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April 2020  

The Citrus College Math Department implemented interactive, high-challenge, high-support pedagogy in all of their open-access corequisites for transfer-level math.  Professors Tracy Nguyen and Victoria Dominguez are both experienced online instructors who were instrumental in helping to quickly move this innovative pedagogy into online classes during the current crisis. They share tips and strategies used in Statistics and Applied Calculus with corequisite support.


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April 2020  

Rachel Polakoski from Cuyamaca College and Kathy Kubo from College of the Canyons have successfully taught Statistics with concurrent support using high-challenge, high-support pedagogy. They share tips and strategies for taking this pedagogy into the online environment.


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April 2020  

CAP leader and Cuyamaca ESL Professor Guillermo Colls shares tips and tricks for moving an ESL course online and answers your questions as we all work to move our classes online.


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March 2020  

Recorded version of webinar by Citrus College English instructor Jamie Dingman, addressing questions and concerns of faculty making the sudden shift to online instruction due to Covid-19.


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February 2020  

Third issue of the CAPacity Gazette, a newsletter from the California Acceleration Project 

February 2020


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December 2019  

Statewide analysis of community college course schedules to assess the extent to which colleges are meeting the AB 705 standard of maximizing student completion of transferable English and math requirements.


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October 2019  

Free and open online Statistics course developed by faculty at Los Medanos and Cuyamaca colleges


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September 2019  

A new law, Assembly Bill 705 (Irwin), is driving dramatic changes in how California Community Colleges place students into English and math courses. B...

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June 2019  

This framework for teaching in an integrated reading and writing context was first developed by Katie Hern in 2011 for use in CAP professional development programs, and later updated with input from faculty at Irvine Valley and Solano colleges.

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May 2019  

The second issue of the CAPacity Gazette features stories from colleges that are transforming ESL, English, and math, including Cosumnes River, Foothill, Porterville, MiraCosta, Mt. San Antonio, Reedley, and Cuyamaca colleges, plus new corequisite remediation data from the Multiple Measures Assessment Project.

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April 2019  

A set of resources to support colleges to implement AB 705 in ways that produce the greatest gains in student completion and equity. 


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March 2019  

This article uses a disparate impact analysis framework to assess the impact of a policy change in writing assessment that roughly doubled the proportion of students placing into college English at Butte College, a two-year college in California. After establishing the disparate impact of placement, we tracked how students performed in college English, subsequent college courses, and overall college completion under the new policy. We found that substantially more students completed college English compared to previous cohorts, with Asian, African American, Latinx, and Native American students’ completion of college English doubling or tripling. Upon taking subsequent college courses, students placing into college English under the new policy performed as well as those who had qualified for college English under the more restrictive policy. Overall college completion outcomes, including degree completion and meeting the criteria for transferring to 4-year universities, have generally improved and become more equitable since the 2011 policy change. These findings suggest that broadening access to college English can be a powerful lever for reducing racial and ethnic gaps in the completion of college English and may help to reduce gaps in the attainment of other, longer-term college completion outcomes.

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February 2019  

The first issue of CAP's newsletter features early results and student profiles from California community colleges that are ahead of schedule in implementing AB 705 reforms.


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July 2018  

A Seat at the Table features three colleges where corequisite remediation and accelerated ESL instruction are producing substantial gains in completion and equity. Interviews with faculty at these colleges shed light on the classroom practices, teacher mindsets, and professional development efforts that are helping more students to succeed, providing useful guidance for other community colleges on how to implement the dramatic changes required by new legislation in California (AB 705).


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September 2017  

Cuyamaca College is the first community college in California to completely transform math remediation–from how it assesses and places students into math courses, to the courses it offers, to what happens in the classroom. Most students at Cuyamaca can now complete their math requirements in one semester. Students in math-intensive majors take no more than one semester of math that doesn’t count toward a bachelor’s degree. And math faculty are teaching with “brains-on” activities and collaborative pedagogy. The result? Completion of transferable, college-level math has increased nearly sevenfold among students who would have previously taken remedial courses, with dramatic gains for all racial and ethnic groups. Cuyamaca’s experience points the way for the rest of the state, revealing what’s possible when colleges step up to transform their systems on behalf of students. This new publication from the California Acceleration Project provides a window into Cuyamaca's transformation, including data from the first year, classroom illustrations, and reflections from students and teachers in the program.


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July 2017  

Prepared for the 2017 CAP Community of Practice, this packet includes thematic outlines from accelerated, integrated reading and writing courses taught by past participants of the program. Each outline provides the theme, primary texts, and inquiry questions for the course, along with the name and email address of the instructor who developed the course and is willing to share materials. 


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April 2017  

A new report from the California Acceleration Project features community colleges that have transformed their policies to enable the majority of students to bypass remediation and begin directly in college-level courses. Up the the Challenge: Community Colleges Expand Access to College-Level Courses features student stories and success data from Cuyamaca College, College of the Canyons, Las Positas College, Solano College, Skyline College, and Sacramento City College. The colleges featured in Up to the Challenge used high school grades to place students into English and math courses, instead of their prior practice of relying almost exclusively on standardized tests. They also replaced traditional remedial courses with co-requisite models that enable students to begin directly in transferable college-level courses with 2 or 3 units of additional support. The result? Immediate and dramatic increases in student completion of college-level English and math, a critical early momentum point toward degrees and transfer. 


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December 2016  

At many California community colleges, faculty have often never seen data on their own placement policies. If asked, they wouldn't be able to tell you how many students qualify for transfer-level courses in English and math, how many have to take two or more remedial classes, and how placement rates vary across different racial/ethnic groups. This template helps to make placement practices more visible, so that colleges can understand the impact of their policies on student equity and completion. 


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Areas of Impact > Placement Reform

October 2016  

Capacity Unleashed tells the stories of 13 students who participated in alternative math remediation at City College of San Francisco, Berkeley City College, College of the Canyons in Santa Clarita, and Cuyamaca College in San Diego. These colleges are among the 35 institutions in the state offering accelerated statistics pathways with the California Acceleration Project.


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June 2016  

This handout was produced for CAP faculty workshops. It outlines the major texts, tests, papers, and rubric from Katie Hern's accelerated course at Chabot College, along with the CAP instructional cycle for integrating reading and writing.


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June 2016  

In these handouts developed for faculty participating in the CAP Community of Practice, we define six broad strategies for addressing the affective domain, with sample practices for each, and we offer ideas for how faculty can employ a "growth-oriented" approach to grading student work in English composition.


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January 2016  

This article highlights research showing that students of color are placed at a structural disadvantage by traditional approaches to remediation, making them less likely to succeed in college. It features results from colleges in the California Acceleration Project that have narrowed racial achievement gaps by changing placement policies and curricula to accelerate students' progress through college-level courses.

Read more >


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November 2015  

Three-quarters of California community college students are classified "unprepared" upon entry, and their long-term outcomes are bleak. This is often framed as a "college readiness" problem in the high schools, but a growing body of research suggests that incoming students are actually more ready than community colleges have recognized.

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August 2015  

This four-page brief synthesizes the national research on practices community colleges are using to substantially increase student completion of college-level courses and narrow racial achievement gaps.

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December 2014  

This article for trustees presents key research into what community colleges can do to increase completion among students traditionally classified "unprepared," along with recommendations for how trustees can support these efforts. 

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November 2014  

What happened when Butte College changed its placement policy to more than double the proportion of incoming students qualifying for college English? The short answer: completion of college English increased substantially college-wide and achievement gaps narrowed, especially for Black and Hispanic students.

Read more >


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October 2014  

This 2014 article from New Directions in Community Colleges discusses the factors that have helped mobilize remediation reform across California's 112 decentralized community colleges, including building a shared understanding of the problem, using data from existing accelerated models to help faculty see that students are more capable than previously believed, and collaborative faculty development efforts organized around shared principles of instructional design.


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April 2014  

This quasi-experimental study found "large and robust" increases in student completion of transferable English and math courses at the first 16 colleges offering redesigned, accelerated pathways with the California Acceleration Project.


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December 2013  

Addressing an important gap in the dialogue about college completion, this brief goes beyond discussions of curricular structure to focus on how faculty teach. It articulates a core set of principles and practices for teaching in accelerated models of English and math, with illustrations from community college classrooms across California.

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June 2012  

This 2012 article from the national magazine Change describes the beginnings of the California Acceleration Project, including data from early accelerated models, the design principles shared by the first CAP colleges, and some of the local adaptations colleges made as they began rethinking remediation.


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December 2011  

This 2011 report presents key data from Chabot College’s long-standing model of accelerated developmental English, a four-unit integrated reading and writing course that is one-level-below College English and open to any student.


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July 2010  

In this 2010 article, Katie Hern and Myra Snell make the case that high attrition rates are structurally guaranteed in long developmental sequences and that open-access accelerated courses are a promising way to increase completion rates in college-level English and Math. Published in the RP Group's statewide publication Perspectives, the article marks the beginning of the California Acceleration Project.


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