Teaching

April 2021  

What is going on when success rates range from 20 to 100 percent across different sections of the same course? Is it AB 705? Online vs. face-to-face? Student factors like race or high school preparation? Faculty factors like part- vs. full-time status? Something else? Researchers from De Anza College present their investigation into the variability in pass rates in transfer-level math and English. Then an English faculty member from Irvine Valley College shares practical tips for addressing variability as a department.


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March 2021  

In this interactive session, Joe Feldman, career educator and author of the book Grading for Equity, and Dr. Shantha Smith provide a brief overview of the history of traditional grading and how the continued use of those practices can negatively impact teaching and learning, raise stress, and perpetuate disparities. They introduce a framework for equitable grading and provide an example, then California community college faculty share practices they have adopted based on Feldman's work, and their impact on students.


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

March 2021  

Examining the disaggregated success data for our own courses can bring up feelings of defensiveness, shame, frustration, and hopelessness. Three English faculty from Sacramento City College share how confronting and reflecting on our own data allowed us to move from these initial reactions to concrete, targeted actions that lead to more equitable outcomes, even in our current online environment. We also discuss three ways our college has supported faculty in this process.


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January 2021  

Statewide research shows that English language learners who graduated from a U.S. high school are at least twice as likely to complete transfer-level English if they enroll in the course directly rather than taking a stand-alone ESL class. However, those students often benefit from support in English language conventions and cultural context. To address this, colleges across California are designating specific sections of transfer-level English for ESL students. Learn about Irvine Valley College's model and strategies to address the writing and language needs of ESL writers in transfer-level English.


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

November 2020  

ESL instructors sometimes avoid difficult topics like race, civil rights, or immigration in the beginning ESL classroom out of concern that the language of those topics might be too "advanced.” However, our students engage with such difficult topics on a daily basis, so early exposure to, and practice with, that language may benefit them. In this Nov. 6, 2020 webinar, the presenters share approaches to discussing complex social issues in beginning ESL classrooms with examples from their classrooms.


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

August 2020  

Though ESL and English have long been seen as two very separate disciplines, viewing the same students’ writing across multiple semesters reveals that students’ English can and does develop as they tackle the challenges of college-level coursework.  Following a close examination of selected students’ work, the presenters will share inclusive practices to support students from varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds in composition courses.

 


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

April 2020  

The Citrus College Math Department implemented interactive, high-challenge, high-support pedagogy in all of their open-access corequisites for transfer-level math.  Professors Tracy Nguyen and Victoria Dominguez are both experienced online instructors who were instrumental in helping to quickly move this innovative pedagogy into online classes during the current crisis. They share tips and strategies used in Statistics and Applied Calculus with corequisite support.


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April 2020  

Rachel Polakoski from Cuyamaca College and Kathy Kubo from College of the Canyons have successfully taught Statistics with concurrent support using high-challenge, high-support pedagogy. They share tips and strategies for taking this pedagogy into the online environment.


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April 2020  

CAP leader and Cuyamaca ESL Professor Guillermo Colls shares tips and tricks for moving an ESL course online and answers your questions as we all work to move our classes online.


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March 2020  

Recorded version of webinar by Citrus College English instructor Jamie Dingman, addressing questions and concerns of faculty making the sudden shift to online instruction due to Covid-19.


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October 2019  

Free and open online Statistics course developed by faculty at Los Medanos and Cuyamaca colleges


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June 2019  

This framework for teaching in an integrated reading and writing context was first developed by Katie Hern in 2011 for use in CAP professional development programs, and later updated with input from faculty at Irvine Valley and Solano colleges.

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July 2017  

Prepared for the 2017 CAP Community of Practice, this packet includes thematic outlines from accelerated, integrated reading and writing courses taught by past participants of the program. Each outline provides the theme, primary texts, and inquiry questions for the course, along with the name and email address of the instructor who developed the course and is willing to share materials. 


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June 2016  

This handout was produced for CAP faculty workshops. It outlines the major texts, tests, papers, and rubric from Katie Hern's accelerated course at Chabot College, along with the CAP instructional cycle for integrating reading and writing.


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June 2016  

In these handouts developed for faculty participating in the CAP Community of Practice, we define six broad strategies for addressing the affective domain, with sample practices for each, and we offer ideas for how faculty can employ a "growth-oriented" approach to grading student work in English composition.


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December 2013  

Addressing an important gap in the dialogue about college completion, this brief goes beyond discussions of curricular structure to focus on how faculty teach. It articulates a core set of principles and practices for teaching in accelerated models of English and math, with illustrations from community college classrooms across California.

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