Entries for 'Equity'

August 2020  

Though ESL and English have long been seen as two very separate disciplines, viewing the same students’ writing across multiple semesters reveals that students’ English can and does develop as they tackle the challenges of college-level coursework.  Following a close examination of selected students’ work, the presenters will share inclusive practices to support students from varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds in composition courses.

 


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Areas of Impact > Teaching

July 2020  

Fourth issue of CAP's newsletter, featuring data and stories from CA community colleges transforming placement and remediation, including highlights from the first semester of full AB 705 implementation


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March 2019  

This article uses a disparate impact analysis framework to assess the impact of a policy change in writing assessment that roughly doubled the proportion of students placing into college English at Butte College, a two-year college in California. After establishing the disparate impact of placement, we tracked how students performed in college English, subsequent college courses, and overall college completion under the new policy. We found that substantially more students completed college English compared to previous cohorts, with Asian, African American, Latinx, and Native American students’ completion of college English doubling or tripling. Upon taking subsequent college courses, students placing into college English under the new policy performed as well as those who had qualified for college English under the more restrictive policy. Overall college completion outcomes, including degree completion and meeting the criteria for transferring to 4-year universities, have generally improved and become more equitable since the 2011 policy change. These findings suggest that broadening access to college English can be a powerful lever for reducing racial and ethnic gaps in the completion of college English and may help to reduce gaps in the attainment of other, longer-term college completion outcomes.

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July 2018  

A Seat at the Table features three colleges where corequisite remediation and accelerated ESL instruction are producing substantial gains in completion and equity. Interviews with faculty at these colleges shed light on the classroom practices, teacher mindsets, and professional development efforts that are helping more students to succeed, providing useful guidance for other community colleges on how to implement the dramatic changes required by new legislation in California (AB 705).


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January 2016  

This article highlights research showing that students of color are placed at a structural disadvantage by traditional approaches to remediation, making them less likely to succeed in college. It features results from colleges in the California Acceleration Project that have narrowed racial achievement gaps by changing placement policies and curricula to accelerate students' progress through college-level courses.

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November 2015  

Three-quarters of California community college students are classified "unprepared" upon entry, and their long-term outcomes are bleak. This is often framed as a "college readiness" problem in the high schools, but a growing body of research suggests that incoming students are actually more ready than community colleges have recognized.

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August 2015  

This four-page brief synthesizes the national research on practices community colleges are using to substantially increase student completion of college-level courses and narrow racial achievement gaps.

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November 2014  

What happened when Butte College changed its placement policy to more than double the proportion of incoming students qualifying for college English? The short answer: completion of college English increased substantially college-wide and achievement gaps narrowed, especially for Black and Hispanic students.

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